November 2010 is Long Term Care Awareness Month, which means it’s the perfect time to talk about your thoughts, concerns, and plans for your own long term care. According to this article by Ken Dychtwald, PhD, “average life expectancy is now at 78 and rising. And, if you’re already 55 or more, life expectancy has soared to around 84.” Furthermore, “Two-thirds of people over age 65 will need some kind of long term care.” This means that it can never be too early to start planning for your future.

Dychtwald points out in his article that “Uninsured medical expenses are the top financial worry among men and women age 55 and over. People… worry most about these expenses’ unpredictability and potential for high costs.” People know that their health is likely to decline slowly as they age, and people know that they will need care—possibly a lot of it—that the cost of this care is rising steadily, and that they will need a way to pay for it. In spite of this, “many Americans are confused about what long term care actually is, and they’re surprised to learn that Medicare and/or traditional health insurance do not cover most long term care needs.”

Life expectancy is rising, and the nature of “old age” is changing quickly. We live longer, but we don’t necessarily live better; and what we’re headed for is an entire generation of people who are unprepared for the rigors and expense of “the new” old-age. Luckily, this doesn’t have to be the case.

The article above suggests that “There are three core topics in family conversations about long term care: (1) what care options are most preferred (e.g. if you needed some help, would you prefer to be cared for at home, in an assisted living facility or in a nursing home?); (2) potential roles and responsibilities of different family members’ (and possibly, help from a professional care coordinator, aid or nurse), should it ever be necessary to manage care; and (3) how to pay for any required long term care (with your or a family members’ savings, through Medicaid or with a long term care insurance policy?).”

We urge our readers to talk about these issues with their loved ones. The conversations may be uncomfortable at first; but fear of the future—lack of preparation for the future—is far worse. Discuss long term care with your loved ones and your trusted advisors. Be ready for whatever the future may bring.